Gullivers and JCB Experience

Gullivers and JCB Experience

I was recently approached to visit Gullivers in Milton Keynes and to see the new JCB accommodation. With half term fast approaching and a two and half year old JCB enthusiast, it would have been silly for me to pass up. With two adults and three children in tow we hoped we wouldn’t be out numbered and struggle with reaching the needs for five and six year old girls, whilst keeping an impatient two and half year old entertained.

We were particularly lucky with the weather and had an unseasonably warm day and we also got to see all the fabulous Halloween decorations and displays. Once inside we checked the map and decided we would try to see as much of the park as possible by planning a methodical route (as much as can be with three kids). My daughter was very happy as since her last visit she has grown enough to now go on some rides with just her friend, which left me free to take Tristan on some of the smaller rides.

All five of us decided to get on the teacups and I let my partner be in charge of spinning it, I can say that was a very bad idea and I felt very sick and dizzy by the end, the kids on the other hand, including my partner (the biggiest kid) all loved it.

For lunch we went to the food hall and agreed on fish and chips. The food was good quality and the wait was minimal. My only gripe was that the seating was extremely cramped. My partner is 6’4′ and disabled and he was in a lot of discomfort trying to sit. I also found as a parent that it wasn’t practical to try to stick a high chair on the end. I think a make over is long overdue and a look into more practical seating to suit everyone with different needs should be addressed.

After lunch my partner took the kids to the JCB zone and I went to have a sneak peek at the new JCB accommodation. Although small the JCB cabin is perfect for a family of four and has all the amenities that you require. You have a pull out double bed, TV, shower room, tea station and outside area, but for me the bunk beds were especially cool and would suit any JCB enthusiasts such as my son. The new JCB cabins will be available over Christmas to book a special Santa sleepover package, for any JCB lovers out there, click here to book. I think it’s something I will certainly have to look into for Tristan for next year.

Gullivers JCB Accomadation
Gullivers JCB Accommodation

After my twenty minutes of peace viewing accommodation, I descended back into the madness of the kids in the JCB zone. Tristan was especially happy with his ‘digga’ and seemed to be getting hold of the controls well, his sister on the other hand takes after me and isn’t as technically minded. With a busy day, nap time fast approaching and the promise of ice cream we headed off into the centre MK to rest our legs.

All in all the day was a success, all kids and adults were exhausted and many fun and happy memories were made. Thank you for having us Gullivers and will be sure to visit again soon.

 

*I was gifted this day out to review, all opinions are my own.*

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Borderline Personality Disorder depression after a manic phase

Borderline Personality Disorder depression after a manic phase

Having borderline personality disorder (BPD) and dealing with depressive and manic phases is a constant battle and something I have come to accept that I might have to live with for the rest of my life. I was diagnosed in February this year with the condition, but looking back now it is obvious that it has controlled me since my teenage years. I have learnt a great deal over these last few months and have can now understand and manage my condition better, even if it is still a work in progress.

I can usually spot the spiral as it is happening, sometimes I can stop, sometimes I feel defeated and unable to battle it. There are certain stages to it, but it often comes out of the blue and unexpectedly. Often the depression and downward spiral will happen after a manic phase, where I have lots of energy and able to undertake many tasks at a time, whilst trying to complete them with urgency that is impossible to maintain. I burn out and the downward spiral begins. I am often convinced that I am cured during a manic phase and am childlike and carefree, but I pay the price after trying to get back to a normal level again between the mania and depression. It’s a constant emotional rollercoaster that leaves me defeated and exhausted.

  • The first stage is usually brought on by trying to manage too many things in one go and spreading myself to thin. The anxiety and worry to manage my life stops me from sleeping first, which always impacts me negatively and makes me heightened to my emotions.
  • The next stage is me reaching out and being needy. I start to rely on people too heavily and become extremely scared of being abandoned and being on my own. I understand I can be a huge burden on people.
  • I start to get paranoid about people talking about me and judging me, whilst having overwhelming fears of abandonment which then makes me cling onto people even more.
  • What usually follows is the most dangerous stage to me and that is to disassociate. When I disassociate I shut down emotionally from anyone around me and I get caught in my own head. I can self-harm, engage in dangerous behaviour or even attempt suicide. This is the stage I do not remember, it is like I have no control of my actions and I am numb from feeling anything.
  • After I get back to reality I am left with the mess I have left, the apologies to make, scars to hide and the guilt. I promise myself I won’t go back to that place again, I will not hurt the people around me and I try to build myself back up again.

1 in 10 people with borderline personality disorder will successfully complete suicide, so I share what I can to help lift stigma and raise understanding knowing that I will always be judged by this condition.

What does help me through this condition is friends who have tried to understand my condition so they can understand me better and Dialectrical Behaviour Therapy. DBT is a talking therapy, which helps me accept who I am and helps me make positive changes in the way I think and deal with things. I am still at the early stages of therapy, but have found it incredibly helpful and with it being a group therapy I feel comfort in knowing that it isn’t just me. I can get better with this disorder, I just need time and support.

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Finding happiness and keeping hold of it

Finding happiness and keeping hold of it

Learning how to grab hold of happiness and be fulfilled in life is not something that comes naturally or easy to me, but like everything I am always up for the challenge and it’s something I am continuing to focus on so I can improve myself. I have written some points down which help me stay focused and thinking in a positive way.

  • For so long I believed that to have happiness I needed to know exactly where I was going in life and have complete clarity. When I turned everything on its head and started to live life with uncertainty I found my true direction in life. I love not having everything mapped out and the uncertainty of the future. As long as I continue to move then I am always going somewhere new, it’s when you stop and stay still that the problems set in and nothing can change.
  • The need of approval of others is something I have always relied on heavily, but when I decided to stop needing that and start living life for my own needs, is when things began to change for me. The more I craved being told I was doing the right thing, the unhappier I became in life. I was giving away any power of mine and not trusting my own instincts in life. If I want to have a fulfilled life then I need to trust myself and follow what I believe is right.
  • Living life in the future and always looking to the next step and achievement can be actually pretty disheartening. I have reached many milestones in life which I thought would complete me, but in fact they haven’t and I need to treat life as one big journey and enjoy the ride, as the only person who can bring me happiness is myself.
  • Understanding that not every day will go the way you intended, but picking yourself back up and carrying on. Some days negativity will creep in and motivation will slow down. This doesn’t mean it’s won it’s just a minor bump in the road and recovering from this quickly is what is important.
  • Letting the negative thoughts through, but remembering to question them and disprove them. Everyday I will have negative thoughts but everyday I have the ability to question them, they are not fact and I have power over them.
  • Always challenging myself and pushing myself out of my comfort zone. The last year I have worked so hard pushing myself out of comfort zone, and the progress I have made in a year still shocks me today. I used to get anxiety attacks doing the food shop, but am now able to turn up somewhere like Britmums where I knew no body and I was able to connect, make plans and navigate myself around London. It’s not easy and anxiety is always there, but knowing I can beat it and challenge it is such a powerful and rewarding feeling.
  • Stop focusing on what is lacking in life. As humans we have a habit of always looking at what life is lacking and not being satisfied with what we have. Sometimes you need to take a moment to be present in the moment and just enjoy what you have around you.
  • Neglecting what I love. When I first became a mother I stopped doing stuff for me and it was not good for my mental wellbeing. I now know to focus on my passions in life to make sure that I can always continue to grow and always have my purpose.

I would love to hear of anyone else’s tips for happiness.

 

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Britmums live and finding my voice again

Britmums live and finding my voice again

It’s been a tough few months to say the least, with breakdown of my marriage and figuring out life as single mother two. I’ve felt unable to have a voice and in truth I have noticed the effect it has been having on my mental wellbeing by bottling things up and not having an outlet. I am starting counselling again to try to work through my thought process and I am still completing my online course in a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Diploma. I am re-focusing my energy, trying to stay away from negativity and focusing on being a better person for myself and my children. I know I am not perfect and I have made mistakes, but I am trying to move forward and learn from this experience.

Last week I attended Britmums Live for the first time and to be honest the thought of going did fill me full of anxiety. If I would have had a choice I probably would have pulled out, but some how I managed to put my anxiety aside and get on with it, with the support of someone special to me and a much-needed lift into London.

I was excited about the workshops where I could improve on my blog and it’s safe to say it didn’t disappoint and I got so much out of it. It helped me realise that I needed to find my voice again and also look at a new direction for my blog. Mental health has been a huge part of my blog in the last year, but it’s something I want to expand on and also branch out from in some way. It’s a work in progress and a plan of action is underway.

The best bit about Britmums for me was connecting with some of my favourite bloggers including meeting the lovely Vicki from Honest Mum for the second time this year. Vicki just has it, she has confidence, she’s engaging and she actually wants to communicate with everyone. I was also lucky enough to meet the amazing Susi from So Happy In Town (SHIT) and we instantly hit it off, this lady has done so much with her blog in such a short space of time is certainly one to watch out for. Kirsty from the amazing blog Winnettes was so sweet and as bubbly in person as you would expect from her lovely blog.

Britmums
Just some of the lovely ladies I met on the day.

Britmums was worth the visit and something I plan to go back to next year for the whole day and evening, to get as much as possible out of it. It’s helped me re-focus on my blog and find my voice again and connect with some lovely inspiring ladies. I even managed the underground and train home on my own, which for me with little to no sense of direction is a huge achievement in itself.

Here is to the future of The Muddled Mother.

 

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What was the best advice you received to battle through postnatal depression?

What was the best advice you received to battle through postnatal depression?

Postnatal depression sucks, it is isolating, exhausting and makes you forget who you are whilst it deprives you from making special memories with your beautiful new baby. For me the battle through postnatal depression was a long hard slog and without support and help I honestly don’t know what I would have done, but the good news is I survived, just like everyone can with the right advice and support. My blog heavily focuses on my battle through postnatal depression and I do my best to provide advice and support in an honest and loving way.

Unfortunately a stigma still surrounds mental illness in general and unless we don’t keep talking about it nothing will change. There are many parenting blogs around and it’s something I love being a part of, but even I was surprised when I first started blogging a few months ago at how many mummy bloggers have also struggled through postnatal depression when in the real world I didn’t seem to know that many mums who were going through this battle. Something changed once I hit publish on my first post and that something was conversation, I started getting messages from Facebook friends and even strangers who could resonate with how I felt and that also have some kind of experience of postnatal depression. My going public I quickly realised that I wasn’t alone and talking with other women helped me understand my own battle so much better.

I decided to ask some other mummy bloggers what was the best piece of advice that received whist battling postnatal depression and here is what they came up with.

 

  • Sophie from Soph Obsessed shared “I was told by a really good friend that what I was feeling was normal! This just really resonated with me and reassured me because the whole time all I was thinking was ‘You are not normal!’

 

  • Laura from Five Little Doves shared  “The best advice I had was to see my GP. Having suffered in silence for so long, taking that first step to getting the help I needed was a major turning point.”

 

  • Sophia from Tattooed Tea Lady shared “Never be afraid to speak out. Talking to your GP is a huge and brave step to make – but you can also talk to friends, family, anyone who you feel comfortable. PND can be an extremely scary thing to go through, particularly with the media perception only ever sharing the worst instances – you are not alone, people want to help and you will come through the other side. “

 

  • Sarah from  A Few Favourite Things shared “To take each hour as it comes. Instead of thinking about the day ahead and how I would manage, I was told to break it up into chunks.”

 

  • Emma from Me and B Make Tea shared “Go talk to someone – be it your doctor, a therapist, a friend or someone online. Just talk.”

 

  • Lynne from A Day in The Life of a Mum of 6 shared “Mine would have to be building up the courage to get help. Try and not bottle your feelings up and take all the help you can either medical or help at home.”

 

  • Veronica from My Parenting Journey shared “I was feeling off when I had my first baby, first thing I did was write a journal, poured everything I was feeling (joy, fear, sadness, everything). Then one day I started talking to myself, it’s funny thinking about it now, but it helped me. I encouraged myself and assured myself that everything’s going to be okay. After than you should start talking to someone, talking would really help.”

 

  • Emma from Our Fairy Tale Adventure shared “It’s really okay to admit you are struggling. I was so scared that if I admitted I was finding it difficult, that someone would come and take my baby away from me. But that didn’t happen, I got help, someone to just talk to… I got support. So please reach out if you are finding it difficult. Reach out to somebody! Parenting is hard. Parenting when you feel alone is even harder and it really doesn’t have to be like that.”

 

  • Emma from The Cheshire Wife shared “Don’t be afraid to ask for help! It took me 18 months of feeling rubbish to ask my Heath visitor for help.”

 

Personally for me my best advice is be honest and patient with yourself. Postnatal depression is a tough battle and something that will take time to overcome. The other thing is a big one for me, which is to let go of guilt, as it will hold you back from getting better.

Many thanks to all the bloggers that were happy enough to contribute to my post.

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Making a occasion special with a personalised gift from Gifts Online 4 U

If you are anything like me you like to surprise a friend or loved one with something unique and personal for a special occasion, but having the time or the energy to make something yourself is often just a distant fantasy, life is hard and sometimes you need to just get off of Pinterest despite your best intentions and get someone else to do all the hard work for you. Life is hard especially when you throw work, families, children and the many over commitments we seem to always be juggling, so when Gifts Online 4 U contacted me recently about their beautiful personalised engraved champagne bottles I jumped at the chance knowing I had a Hen Party fast approaching for a very dear friend. My friend is like me and loves anything with a sentimental message and she’s a big fan of the bubbly stuff, win, win!

Engraved Champagne
The beautifully engraved Champagne.

This website isn’t just a one trick pony and goes above and beyond so you can find a special gift for even the most awkward family member with over 4,500 personalised gifts to choose from. The website is easy to navigate and split through categories and has plenty of stuff for the forever awkward men folk in our life. I found there was a great selection for what ever budget you had and it was easy to narrow down. The order process was simply and it was easy to fill in the form to make your personalised message for your gift. I was surprised how quick the turn around time was, especially as it was personalised, so having something personal doesn’t mean long delivery times.

I am confident that I will use the website again for other occasions such as weddings, christenings and birthdays and what makes me love it even more is that 99% of the gifts are manufactured in-house in Lincolnshire. Ordering from Gifts Online 4 u is a personalised experience to find the perfect gift for anyone.

For gifts with a bit of added luxury I love the look of the Personalised Champagne bottles and think these would be the perfect gift for any wedding and if you want to go the extra mile these Personalised Champagne Flutes are elegantly stunning.

Personalised Mr and Mrs Vintage Champagne Gift with Pewter Label
Personalised Mr and Mrs Vintage Champagne Gift with Pewter Label

 

 

Personalised engraved butterfly flutes
Personalised engraved butterfly flutes, perfect gift for a wedding, especially with one of the personalised Champagne bottles.

The bride to be was really impressed with the thoughtful gift and said the champagne was drunk the following Sunday with the family whilst the bottle has been kept as a lovely memento to a very slightly messy hen party weekend in Cambridge. The engraving on the bottle was beautifully detailed and I was impressed with how well packed it was delivered to me.

To the lovely bride to be Lianne.

*I was gifted the engraved champagne gift from Gifts Online 4 U. All opinions are my own.*

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The unlikely benefits of depression

The unlikely benefits of depression

I love to look for the silver lining and I have come up with the unlikely benefits of depression that I have found to be true for me. This does not take away from the fact that it is horrendous, but now I am for the most part out the other side, I like to look at some small positives I have found through my depression journey.

  • I now have a new kind of appreciation for the good days, I never know when it could all be sucked away again, so I do appreciate when things are going well and I am feeling mentally strong.
  • I am much more in touch with my emotions than I ever was before. I now know all emotions are needed and valid and that I should never be ashamed or try to hide them.
  • I’ve talked about this before and I think it is one of the most important things I have learnt, which is empathy. Depression has changed my outlook in life and taught me not to judge as we never know someone’s personal battle. I have great empathy and now regard it as one of my best attributes.
  • I have taken time to find what gives me joy in life. I have had to work out what makes me happy in life and have found some hidden talents that I might not have ever discovered otherwise.
  • I have bonded with friends and made new friends on a different level. To talk about depression is something very personal and by talking about it I have found some amazing people.
  • I have learnt not to hide emotions anymore. I was very good at hiding who I was out of fear of making someone else uncomfortable. I have found new ways to express my emotions in a healthy way which has made me better at communicating.
  • I am always looking at new ways to make myself happy. I know how easy it is to get sucked back into depression so I am always aware of trying to keep myself busy and happy.
  • If and when depression creeps back into my life, I now know I have survived depression which inspires me to fight it again.
  • I can help someone else by showing them that they are not alone in this battle and that you can survive it and also flourish.
  • I have now proven to myself that I am a fighter and that I am incredibly strong. To fight a battle with your own mind is one the toughest and I am pretty proud of what I have achieved.
  • I no longer take sleep, health, exercise and diet for granted. I now know that  it is important to focus on these and that they make a huge difference in your mental wellbeing.

What has depression taught you?

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Be fearless in the pursuit of happiness

Being fearless in the pursuit of happiness should be something we all should be able to do, but like with many things saying it is much easier than doing it. For so long I have worried about other people’s opinions, have tried to live up to other people’s standards and punished myself if I haven’t lived up to these. This has done nothing for my happiness and has forever held me back in finding happiness.

As a child I was brought up as a Christian and honestly believed I needed to punish myself every time I made a mistake or I would go to hell. I now have learnt to respect all religions, whilst being able to formulate my own ideas about them and not take it all too literally. I do believe in something, but to be honest I really don’t know what exactly. I don’t know why we feel that we should punish ourselves for not living up to standards which are often unattainable, we are only human after all and why should be always be fearful. The perception of the world around you is left up to your own interpretation.

As I have got older I noticed happy people don’t seem to put as much focus on what others think, they tend to do just ‘do’. Life isn’t about material possessions to make you happy and won’t lead happiness and I’m a great believer it’s about the experiences of life instead. I’m always trying now to just enjoy the moment and not try to worry about pointless material goods which actually don’t feel any gaps in your life long-term. I won’t look back in ten years and have fond memories of a silly priced handbag I bought, but instead will think back to a holiday with my children or a trip away with friends.

Everything is the world is temporary, the good and the bad and to find happiness we need to take the good with the bad and remember we can’t fully appreciate happiness unless we have also felt sadness. It’s fine to go through a  tough time, it teaches you important life lessons we need to learn, from every difficult time we have gone through in our lives it has shaped, moulded us and taught us something new.

To find happiness you need to do what you love, and if you don’t I think it’s important to make small changes where you can. We need to invest in ourselves and make sure we are doing something for our souls that we gain something from. If you hate your job then please find something else to do, but if that isn’t a possibility make sure you have time to still do stuff you love. Find a creative outlet, study something you love or go places that will make you smile. Everyone can be creative with something, it’s not just about making or creating, but about writing, building, dancing, music, photography, baking, colouring etc. Everyone can find a creative outlet.

To be truly happy I believe you need to be present and it’s something I have written about many times before and it’s something I am forever trying to remind myself. To be depressed you are living in the past and not letting your life flourish and grow. The little moments of happiness in life are the memories that you want to look back on, nothing else. It’s not easy to find a good balance of how to reflect on your past and look to your future, but I think it’s valuable and productive.

I believe it’s more work to be unhappy than to be happy. If you are sad, looking back on all that is wrong in your past you are just using lots of energy in a negative way. Being happy takes time and involves lots of dedication in yourself, but you can change your life if you are willing to. Don’t com-pare your lives against others and their progress, set small goals, look at the overall picture and be patient. Be fearless in the pursuit of happiness, you have nothing to lose.

photography credit to Ricky Lee Photography 

 

Be fearless in the pursuit of happiness

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The worry that my own mental health problems have damaged my daughter

The worry that my own mental health problems have damaged my daughter

I have struggled with mental health problems for years without even being aware of them. Well to be honest I did know something wasn’t right with me, but I just believed I was a bad person and my anger and depression was my own fault. Depression and anxiety have dominated me and effected me all of my adult life and after having my second child two years ago and my postnatal depression came to a head and I realised I needed to fix me. I was scared that in this process I could further hurt myself and I was right. To finally move on from my old life I needed to deal with my past to some extent and it was painful. I sunk lower than I ever went before and worried that by dealing with certain things that had happened that I would never feel happiness again.

Having to deal with my own mental health problems with a baby and small child at home was tough and not ideal and it was impossible for me to shield them completely with what I was going through. My daughter Jasmine saw me cry too much, not able to look after myself and many specialists coming into our house trying to help her broken mother. This is not what I wanted, but I either tried to heal at home or leave my family all together and go into hospital. Jasmine grew up quick and learnt what to say to help me, to encourage me and she was my strength when I had none left.

Things have been steadily improving over the last few months and I am in a much better place mentally. I am working on being the right role model to my daughter and I am a much better parent than I was six months ago. I am certain my mental health problems have affected my daughter and that’s something I do feel guilt over. I didn’t want my daughter to see me like the way she did, I tried to hide it as much as I could, but I know my child and she is bright and was picking up on the problems going on and it was affecting her too. Jasmine came home last February with her dad, for them to find that I had taken an overdose. Jasmine doesn’t remember what happened as she was sent upstairs and missed the police and crisis team taking me to hospital, but I’m certain she knew something was wrong

Children are more perceptive than we give them credit for and at times I feel like she is punishing me or that our bond has been damaged for what I had to put her through. Her concentration at school has suffered, her behaviour and even her sleep have been affected. My little girl gets frustrated and angry at times and I understand her frustration and it’s something we are always working on. I don’t want my girl to grow up angry with the world and I want her to continue to flourish and not become who I was as a teenager.

All I can do now is keep encouraging her, showing her my strength and dedicating my time on my own daughters mental health. We are working on yoga and mindfulness to help our bond and our mental wellbeing and I am seeing an improvement. I just hope she knows how hard I am trying for her and that everything I do is for her. I don’t want her to grow up with the same problems that I had and I hope she doesn’t grow up resenting me for what I put her through.

My bond with Jasmine was affected through my battle with mental health, but we now have a more intense kind of bond. My daughter has shown me such compassion through my struggles, I have seen so much of my self in her, that it has helped me understand myself and her better. She really was a blessing for me, my savour and my strength.

Jasmine I am sorry for expecting too much from you at such a young age, I am sorry for not being strong enough at times to be a mother to you and I am sorry for resenting you when I was struggling through my PND. I love you more than you will ever know and will spend the rest of my life making it up to you. I will always be there for you, no matter what. I love you.

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My daughter has confidence, but I am a hypocrite

My daughter has confidence, but I am a hypocrite

My daughter Jasmine is now five and has blossomed from a pre-schooler to a very confident, extremely sassy five year old and I’m a little jealous of how she carries herself, I want to be a bit more like her, but I feel like a hypocrite.

Jasmine as a baby and toddler was super clingy and would scream when I left her to go to work and would hate it if daddy had to put her to bed instead of mummy. She was my shadow and I got used to having my velcro child by my side. When her brother came along when she was three she took it hard and struggled to accept that I wasn’t just hers anymore and we worked hard to build her confidence around other people. When she started pre-school three months later she went off with very little trouble and she started to flourish.

Jasmine is now at the end of reception and is more than happy to run off every morning without a look back at me. She talks to her friends, is always first to say if she thinks some injustice is going on whilst playing and will go off to her teachers happily to show them what she has mastered that day. At a party she is the first on the dance flower, will happily hold someone else’s hand who needs encouragement and will stand up for her friend and herself. I have some how made a confident, self-assured and a strong little girl, whilst my confidence and self-esteem is still a constant fight. Why am I such a hypocrite.

My daughter doesn’t tell people things they want to hear, she is confident in her own skin and looks and everyday is a new fun day to explore, learn and be happy. I have decided it’s about time that I start to take a page out of my daughters book and start getting a little Jazzy with my life. I have put so much effort into my daughter, assuring her, telling her about her wonderful attributes and telling her to be happy with who she is, but I have been a hypocrite the whole time.

I have been such a hypocrite as I do not do the same to myself. I get undressed and pick apart everything that is wrong with my body, my hair, my face, my intelligence and my mind. I may be able to hide this from her when she’s young, but eventually she will see through it. She will notice the little comments about my weight, the little put me downs I say to myself and the negative comments. To be a role model I need to work on myself and stop putting myself down. I owe her this as much as I owe myself.

Why do we struggle so much to accept ourselves for who we are, but we can happily accept our partners flaws and all? I wouldn’t put my husband down for his looks or his intelligence or a friend, but yet I do it to myself constantly. I always see the best in people, but I struggle to see it in myself, so I am going to write down a list of what I love about myself.

What I love about me.

  • My quick wit. I am pretty funny and if you do get to know we you will realise I am also quick-witted and great for some banter.
  • My empathy. I have BPD so I am an emotional person and it has taught me how to have great empathy with others.
  • I have great lips. People pay for lip fillers, but I don’t need them as I’ve been blessed with beautiful lips.
  • I am tall. I’m 5ft 10″ and I love being tall, I can hide a multitude of signs having the extra height and love nothing more than wearing some heels on a night out and being one of the tallest.
  • I am caring. I care so much and sometimes too much about my children, friends, family, pets and mental health. If I care about something that I am incredibly passionate about it.
  • I found my talent in writing. I might not be perfect, but I love it and I feel good for finding something that brings me so much joy.
  • I’ve got good boobs. They’re not huge, they fit my frame, but they have done me proud and nursed two children for a total of three years.
  • I am healthy. I might not be fighting fit and I know there is much room for improvement, but my health is in good order and that is something that should never be taken for granted.
  • I am a good mum. I’m not perfect I have had to fight to still be here with my battle with PND, but I know now I am a good mum and I am proud of how far I’ve come.

My challenge is to start to love myself more, keep up with positive affirmations, working on myself and learning to love my body so I can say I am confident and I am not a hypocrite. #BeMoreJazzy

 

#BeMoreJazzy

 

 

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