How to practice self-love

How to practice self-love

When people hear self-love they often think someone is being narcissistic and vain, but this is not true. To love yourself is something extremely powerful and it’s something I am working on right now to improve my mental wellbeing. As humans we often look to other people to show us love and to make us feel fulfilled, which I have found out doesn’t work. We must first love ourselves to feel complete and not search for it from other people. Below are some of the things I have been practicing to self-love.

  • Look in the mirror and appreciate something about your appearance, however small.
  • Take 5 minutes every day to practice mindfulness. For me I like to breath in for 3 seconds and breath out for 5 seconds and just focus on the breathing. It’s extremely relaxing and helps me connect and not be stuck in my own head.
  • Appreciate when you have done something difficult even if it’s just going to work that day.
  • Do what excites you. Find your passion and do it, mine is writing, but I also enjoy drawing and baking.
  • Stop comparing yourself to others. You are your own person, you are unique and special and you need to own that.
  • Wake up every day and pay yourself a compliment and mean it. Maybe you did something the day before which was particularly difficult and you handled it well.
  • Surround yourself with positive people who encourage you to succeed and also make sure you do the same back to them. My friends are a huge source of encouragement to me and I hope I am back to them.
  • Choose food that nourishes your body. That McDonalds may taste good at the time, but how does it make you feel after?
  • Treat yourself to food that makes you happy. I know I’ve just gone against the above point, but everything in moderation and sometimes a block of chocolate is good for your soul. Eat it mindfully and enjoy it.
  • Remember to pat yourself on the back even if the achievement is only small. Care for your inner child and say well done.
  • Accept your flaws. My body isn’t perfect, but it is mine and it’s grown two humans and nourished them. Loving your body is probably one of the hardest ones, especially for us ladies, but remember how amazing it is and all it’s gone through.
  • Get active. Exercise makes you feel good and there is no excuse not to. I hated the gym and running, but have found a love in team sports, which encourages me to perform and work harder for my team mates.
  • Push yourself out of your comfort zone, even if it’s only small steps.
  • Leave toxic relationships. Certain people in my life did seem to project a lot of their own issues on me for a long time. Now I am able to notice it, I don’t let it affect me in the same way it used to.
  • Be forgiving of others, but most of all yourself. Don’t beat yourself up and just forgive and move on. Don’t spend time and energy going over the same thing that is now in the past.
  • Treat everyone you meet in the same way you want to be treated. Be polite, have manners, be kind and remember everyone is having their own struggles in life.
  • Don’t be alone when you need help. If you are struggling, seek out a friend or family to gain some perspective on the situation.
  • Don’t seek approval from others. I tried this for so long and it’s not helpful and constructive in any way. If someone doesn’t approve then it’s their problem not yours.
  • Let go of the past and any trauma. I know from experience this isn’t easy and may require therapy, but believe me it is worth it and so freeing to move on.
  • Shut up that negative voice in your head. I know it won’t go away, but just don’t acknowledge it and let those negative thoughts wash by you.
  • When you are feeling good write down all your best traits, achievements etc and when you are having a less than perfect day reflect back to it.

Self-love takes time and practice and won’t happen over night, be patient with yourself and remember anything worth having takes dedication.


Mummy and daughter bracelet from Kaya Jewellery - Plus giveaway

Mummy and daughter bracelet from KAYA Jewellery – Plus giveaway

I was recently contacted by the lovely people of KAYA Jewellery to review one of their stunning mother and daughter sets. Obviously I couldn’t say no once I looked on their website and knew that Jasmine would be so happy with this sweet keepsake. KAYA Jewellery have generously offered a £40 voucher to my readers, so please have a read through my review and enter the giveaway below. Good luck!

KAYA Jewellery recently launched their UK web store to offer hand engraved, beautiful and timeless jewellery to celebrate the special bonds between mother and child, friends and family.

The set I choose for me and Jasmine is a mother and daughter silver bracelet set. One bracelet has the heart and the other has the key. This seemed perfect for me and Jasmine and she happily agreed with my choice.

Our beautiful set

My parcel was delivered quickly and Jasmine and I were excited to unwrap our parcel. The bracelets came in two beautiful pink satin bags and included two silver polishing cloths. The bracelets are made in the UK, have adjustable extension chains and are great quality.

This is a gift that Jasmine and I will treasure for a long time, it’s perfect for us to wear to any special occasion and is the perfect keepsake to hold on to forever. I think this would be an ideal gift for Mothers Day, Birthdays or Christmas. If you are a father to a daughter I think you could score yourself some major brownie points with this gift this coming Mothers Day.

Something that also touched me about KAYA Jewellery is that with every sale they also give back a part of their profit to the Eduki Foundation, a charity whose goal is to help underprivileged children in Gambia to get an education.

Have a look at the beautiful range of mother and daughter jewellery here from KAYA Jewellery and don’t forget to enter the giveaway below for your chance to win a £40 voucher to spend at KAYA Jewellery.








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Competition open to UK residents only


***I was gifted this product to review from KAYA Jewellery. All opinions are of my own***

The day I tried to end it all

The day I tried to end it all

On the 7th of February last year I tried to end it all. I woke up in a hospital bed with a drip in my arm and wires across my body. I had no idea where I was, how I had got there and I didn’t understand what was going on. The day before I had sent my now ex husband out, as I needed some peace and promised him I wouldn’t do anything stupid. I had lied to him and for the first time in weeks I was emotionless, I felt no fear, no guilt and no sadness. Today was the day I wouldn’t have to feel anymore. I didn’t think of the consequences of my actions and just saw it as the only way out. I was fed up of fighting PND (postnatal depression) anymore and felt like I had lost any type of control I had over it. It was a permanent solution to a temporary problem, but I couldn’t see that at the time.

That day whilst under the crisis team care I went into hospital to see my doctor who decided after two weeks they would discharge me. I told them I still felt suicidal and I was scared to be discharged without any other support. Just that conversation sent me into a downward spiral and I felt hopeless even though they said they would see me again in three days. I went home to end it and took as many lorazepam I had (about 10mg), coupled up with a handful of quetiapine (antipsychotics) and zopiclone (sleeping tablets), which I washed down with whiskey. I don’t even enjoy the taste of whiskey, but it was the strongest alcohol in the house. I sat back and let the feeling of calm wash over me, whilst I slipped in and out of consciousness, finally at peace.

What happened next I don’t really know, but this is what I was told afterwards. An old school friend had been checking in with me by messaging me on and off. I didn’t make a huge amount of sense so she contacted my sister and a well fair check was arranged. My husband returned home with the kids and around the same time someone from the crisis team and also a police officer took me to hospital.

The next morning when I had realised what had actually happened the feeling of guilt was horrendous. Knowing my children had seen me in such a state and that I had lied to my husband was terrible. I knew from that moment that I needed to fight, my children didn’t deserve this and if I kept going like this, I would lose them one way or another. I would either be sectioned, dead or I would lose my children and all would take me away from the children I love so much.

I was taken in to talk to someone from the crisis team and told that if I was sectioned that I would never get better. As I have BPD (borderline personality disorder) the worse thing for me, would to be sectioned, they gave me the choice, but I declined. 40% of all inpatient have BPD and once you’re in, its hard to ever get out, as this condition is untreatable with medication and the only way to over come it is to complete DBT (dialectical behaviour therapy).

I started DBT quickly after, but I found it impossible to attend as I couldn’t get help with childcare and had to quit. Eventually once my marriage broke down and I started to get help again I was able to start DBT. I am now 5 months in and it has changed my life. It’s changed the way I deal with my emotions, given me inner peace and helped me regulate when I go into crisis. Things still haven’t been perfect and I still struggle, but I am always making progress. To see where I was a year ago and how I am today, I am proud. I am a better person, I am happier and I’m back to being the mother I want to be. I know that as a single parent that I need to get better as I could lose my children if I don’t and that is my driving force behind my progress.

I share my story in hope that it helps other people going through the same struggles. Admitting you feel suicidal does not mean your children will be taken away from you. I know this was my biggest fears, but social services were actually pretty helpful to me and arranged extra support I needed.  If you need support ask for it, call Samaritans, contact PANDAS, text a friend. Please don’t suffer alone as it’s too much to take on by yourself and it needs to be shared. This does not make you weak, but actually incredibly strong. Life can change so much in a year and I am proof of it. Keep fighting, you’ve got this.

Progress is key.





The strongest mum – Book review

I was recently approached by Macmillan Children’s Books to review a new book called The Strongest Mum By Nicola Kent. Book reviews aren’t my usual thing, but after reading the press release, the story really struck a chord with me.

As I have well documented in my blog, I have struggled with mental health problems, which really amplified after the birth of my second child. With having an older daughter and trying to explain postnatal depression to her in an understanding way, which wouldn’t scare her, I have found this book extremely helpful to get onto the subject.

The story is about a little bear and his mum who is the ‘Strongest Mum In The World’. To little bear his mum seems invincible and he keeps giving her more, and more things to carry and they both realise she can only hold so much and that he also needs to help. This story is a gentle reminded to children to be kind to your parents as everyone has their limit and that it’s good to be helpful and also reminds us as parents that we can only take on so much and we need to be mindful of our mental wellbeing.

Jasmines Thoughts

I have been reading this to my Jasmine who is five and half and the message has come across easily to her. She told me what she liked most about the story was the picture of mum’s handbag with ‘millions’ of things in it as it’s just like mummy’s bag. Jasmine loved the colourful pictures and really enjoyed all the different animals in the book. Over the last couple of weeks we’ve been making an effort to help each other out around the house and Jasmine is now helping with tidying up time and also the dishwasher.

This story doesn’t just depict the struggles of mental health, but also the daily struggles as a parent and taking on far too much, which I think every parent can relate too.

The Strongest Mum is available to purchase from the 8th February 2018. Click here to order.

The Strongest Mum
Jasmine approves

About the Author 

Nicola Kent graduated from the prestigious Cambridge School of Art MA with a distinction and was Highly Commended in the Macmillan Prize for Illustration in 2016. She worked for ten years as a television producer at the BBC and Channel 4 before following her dream of becoming an author and illustrator of children’s books. Nicola lives in London with her partner and two children.

The Strongest Mum

A marriage over and new chapter

A marriage over and new chapter

Writing about how I feel and be honest is something I have found incredibly difficult since my marriage ended in the summer. I feel like I lost my voice and I needed some privacy, whilst I sorted my own head and feelings, but as time has gone by, things have moved forward, emotionally I have found it difficult not having an outlet. I know I need to write for my own sanity, but having the pressure of coming up with content, that reflects me in my current state, that is honest and true to my blog has felt like a massive burden that I have put off. Today I have decided that I need to take the plunge, stop worrying about what everyone else thinks and do something that I love for myself again.

I don’t want to go into too many details, but since my marriage broke down, the months that followed have been the hardest of my life, but also some of the best too. I know I made the decision for the right reason and although painful, it was inevitable. For me my marriage had been over since my suicide attempt at the end of January, but it took months of discovery to finally realise that it was un-fixable and for my own mental wellbeing I needed to end things. Once you fall out of love with someone I don’t think it is possible to ever get it back. I still have the so much respect for my ex husband and think he’s a wonderful father to our children.

A marriage breakdown is incredibly hard and co-parenting children is its own battlefield. With the best intentions of keeping things amicable it’s not been easy for either of us at times and we have pushed each other to the limits. I hope now that we do keep moving forward and keep things amicable for our beautiful children, that we will always share together.

Another big thing to happen in the last few months is to date again, which with two children comes with its own challenges. The right time to date again after a relationship breaks down is different for everyone and I am the first to admit I did move on quickly, but like I have said before I had fallen out of love and hoped to just get back out their and date again. I haven’t dated since I was 20 and I would quickly get bored and move on, but I also found it lots of fun meeting new people and going out for drinks and meals. I took the plunge and went on a date with a guy who I had been messaging and it really was the best thing to happen to me last year. I have met someone who adores me and my children and makes me want to better myself. I now feel like I have a team-mate and someone I can be honest with and doesn’t judge me.

I am well aware for anyone to have a relationship with me isn’t always easy (hats off to my ex for dealing with me at my rock bottom, I do give credit when due), so to find someone who is accepting and wants to understand me better is rare and beautiful. I have borderline personality disorder (also known as emotionally unstable personality disorder), so as a person in a relationship I know I can be pretty draining at times and hard to understand (romantically and also in friendships). My emotions at times can be all over the place, but with the help of DBT (dialectical behaviour therapy) things are far easier to manage than before. I have DBT as a group therapy for two hours a week, which involves lots of homework. I am learning new skills that I am now able to put into practice and although not easy, it is so rewarding being able to see how far I have come in such a short space of time. I still have months ahead of DBT to complete, but I am hoping it’s something I can stick with and I can change for the positive.

Since November I have been getting extra support from the childrens centre and also the health visitor, who have been able to help find me resources and advice that I have needed for the various things going on in my life. I was visited today and after a crappy couple of weeks I was feeling on the teary side, but thinking back now to the conversations we had I think I should be pretty proud of myself. I was reminded constantly today of the various things I have done for myself and children to make our life easier, the extra support I have asked for and my proactive attitude I have had. The problems I have had I have actually managed to fix myself with little help. I have not only been meeting my childrens basic needs, but I have also been meeting their emotional needs. My children are given cuddles, read to, played with and reassured, which may seem small, but those selfless actions help shape them and make them feel secure. I was today reminded of something that I often forget, that despite everything else I am a really good mother to my children and they are loved.

Reflecting back on these last few months I have grown so much and managed to go through an incredible hard things, yet stay positive for the most part. Things are far from perfect and I am forever battling with myself, but I know I am getting things right and I am progressing and learning on the way. I am going to keep writing for me and doing something that I love. I am doing the best I can and that is ok. Leaving 2017 I do have regrets for how I handled certain things and people I upset, but for my own wellbeing I can’t keep dwelling and I just have to accept, learn and now move on to a better 2018.

Gullivers and JCB Experience

Gullivers and JCB Experience

I was recently approached to visit Gullivers in Milton Keynes and to see the new JCB accommodation. With half term fast approaching and a two and half year old JCB enthusiast, it would have been silly for me to pass up. With two adults and three children in tow we hoped we wouldn’t be out numbered and struggle with reaching the needs for five and six year old girls, whilst keeping an impatient two and half year old entertained.

We were particularly lucky with the weather and had an unseasonably warm day and we also got to see all the fabulous Halloween decorations and displays. Once inside we checked the map and decided we would try to see as much of the park as possible by planning a methodical route (as much as can be with three kids). My daughter was very happy as since her last visit she has grown enough to now go on some rides with just her friend, which left me free to take Tristan on some of the smaller rides.

All five of us decided to get on the teacups and I let my partner be in charge of spinning it, I can say that was a very bad idea and I felt very sick and dizzy by the end, the kids on the other hand, including my partner (the biggiest kid) all loved it.

For lunch we went to the food hall and agreed on fish and chips. The food was good quality and the wait was minimal. My only gripe was that the seating was extremely cramped. My partner is 6’4′ and disabled and he was in a lot of discomfort trying to sit. I also found as a parent that it wasn’t practical to try to stick a high chair on the end. I think a make over is long overdue and a look into more practical seating to suit everyone with different needs should be addressed.

After lunch my partner took the kids to the JCB zone and I went to have a sneak peek at the new JCB accommodation. Although small the JCB cabin is perfect for a family of four and has all the amenities that you require. You have a pull out double bed, TV, shower room, tea station and outside area, but for me the bunk beds were especially cool and would suit any JCB enthusiasts such as my son. The new JCB cabins will be available over Christmas to book a special Santa sleepover package, for any JCB lovers out there, click here to book. I think it’s something I will certainly have to look into for Tristan for next year.

Gullivers JCB Accomadation
Gullivers JCB Accommodation

After my twenty minutes of peace viewing accommodation, I descended back into the madness of the kids in the JCB zone. Tristan was especially happy with his ‘digga’ and seemed to be getting hold of the controls well, his sister on the other hand takes after me and isn’t as technically minded. With a busy day, nap time fast approaching and the promise of ice cream we headed off into the centre MK to rest our legs.

All in all the day was a success, all kids and adults were exhausted and many fun and happy memories were made. Thank you for having us Gullivers and will be sure to visit again soon.


*I was gifted this day out to review, all opinions are my own.*

Borderline Personality Disorder depression after a manic phase

Borderline Personality Disorder depression after a manic phase

Having borderline personality disorder (BPD) and dealing with depressive and manic phases is a constant battle and something I have come to accept that I might have to live with for the rest of my life. I was diagnosed in February this year with the condition, but looking back now it is obvious that it has controlled me since my teenage years. I have learnt a great deal over these last few months and have can now understand and manage my condition better, even if it is still a work in progress.

I can usually spot the spiral as it is happening, sometimes I can stop, sometimes I feel defeated and unable to battle it. There are certain stages to it, but it often comes out of the blue and unexpectedly. Often the depression and downward spiral will happen after a manic phase, where I have lots of energy and able to undertake many tasks at a time, whilst trying to complete them with urgency that is impossible to maintain. I burn out and the downward spiral begins. I am often convinced that I am cured during a manic phase and am childlike and carefree, but I pay the price after trying to get back to a normal level again between the mania and depression. It’s a constant emotional rollercoaster that leaves me defeated and exhausted.

  • The first stage is usually brought on by trying to manage too many things in one go and spreading myself to thin. The anxiety and worry to manage my life stops me from sleeping first, which always impacts me negatively and makes me heightened to my emotions.
  • The next stage is me reaching out and being needy. I start to rely on people too heavily and become extremely scared of being abandoned and being on my own. I understand I can be a huge burden on people.
  • I start to get paranoid about people talking about me and judging me, whilst having overwhelming fears of abandonment which then makes me cling onto people even more.
  • What usually follows is the most dangerous stage to me and that is to disassociate. When I disassociate I shut down emotionally from anyone around me and I get caught in my own head. I can self-harm, engage in dangerous behaviour or even attempt suicide. This is the stage I do not remember, it is like I have no control of my actions and I am numb from feeling anything.
  • After I get back to reality I am left with the mess I have left, the apologies to make, scars to hide and the guilt. I promise myself I won’t go back to that place again, I will not hurt the people around me and I try to build myself back up again.

1 in 10 people with borderline personality disorder will successfully complete suicide, so I share what I can to help lift stigma and raise understanding knowing that I will always be judged by this condition.

What does help me through this condition is friends who have tried to understand my condition so they can understand me better and Dialectrical Behaviour Therapy. DBT is a talking therapy, which helps me accept who I am and helps me make positive changes in the way I think and deal with things. I am still at the early stages of therapy, but have found it incredibly helpful and with it being a group therapy I feel comfort in knowing that it isn’t just me. I can get better with this disorder, I just need time and support.

Finding happiness and keeping hold of it

Finding happiness and keeping hold of it

Learning how to grab hold of happiness and be fulfilled in life is not something that comes naturally or easy to me, but like everything I am always up for the challenge and it’s something I am continuing to focus on so I can improve myself. I have written some points down which help me stay focused and thinking in a positive way.

  • For so long I believed that to have happiness I needed to know exactly where I was going in life and have complete clarity. When I turned everything on its head and started to live life with uncertainty I found my true direction in life. I love not having everything mapped out and the uncertainty of the future. As long as I continue to move then I am always going somewhere new, it’s when you stop and stay still that the problems set in and nothing can change.
  • The need of approval of others is something I have always relied on heavily, but when I decided to stop needing that and start living life for my own needs, is when things began to change for me. The more I craved being told I was doing the right thing, the unhappier I became in life. I was giving away any power of mine and not trusting my own instincts in life. If I want to have a fulfilled life then I need to trust myself and follow what I believe is right.
  • Living life in the future and always looking to the next step and achievement can be actually pretty disheartening. I have reached many milestones in life which I thought would complete me, but in fact they haven’t and I need to treat life as one big journey and enjoy the ride, as the only person who can bring me happiness is myself.
  • Understanding that not every day will go the way you intended, but picking yourself back up and carrying on. Some days negativity will creep in and motivation will slow down. This doesn’t mean it’s won it’s just a minor bump in the road and recovering from this quickly is what is important.
  • Letting the negative thoughts through, but remembering to question them and disprove them. Everyday I will have negative thoughts but everyday I have the ability to question them, they are not fact and I have power over them.
  • Always challenging myself and pushing myself out of my comfort zone. The last year I have worked so hard pushing myself out of comfort zone, and the progress I have made in a year still shocks me today. I used to get anxiety attacks doing the food shop, but am now able to turn up somewhere like Britmums where I knew no body and I was able to connect, make plans and navigate myself around London. It’s not easy and anxiety is always there, but knowing I can beat it and challenge it is such a powerful and rewarding feeling.
  • Stop focusing on what is lacking in life. As humans we have a habit of always looking at what life is lacking and not being satisfied with what we have. Sometimes you need to take a moment to be present in the moment and just enjoy what you have around you.
  • Neglecting what I love. When I first became a mother I stopped doing stuff for me and it was not good for my mental wellbeing. I now know to focus on my passions in life to make sure that I can always continue to grow and always have my purpose.

I would love to hear of anyone else’s tips for happiness.


Britmums live and finding my voice again

Britmums live and finding my voice again

It’s been a tough few months to say the least, with breakdown of my marriage and figuring out life as single mother two. I’ve felt unable to have a voice and in truth I have noticed the effect it has been having on my mental wellbeing by bottling things up and not having an outlet. I am starting counselling again to try to work through my thought process and I am still completing my online course in a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Diploma. I am re-focusing my energy, trying to stay away from negativity and focusing on being a better person for myself and my children. I know I am not perfect and I have made mistakes, but I am trying to move forward and learn from this experience.

Last week I attended Britmums Live for the first time and to be honest the thought of going did fill me full of anxiety. If I would have had a choice I probably would have pulled out, but some how I managed to put my anxiety aside and get on with it, with the support of someone special to me and a much-needed lift into London.

I was excited about the workshops where I could improve on my blog and it’s safe to say it didn’t disappoint and I got so much out of it. It helped me realise that I needed to find my voice again and also look at a new direction for my blog. Mental health has been a huge part of my blog in the last year, but it’s something I want to expand on and also branch out from in some way. It’s a work in progress and a plan of action is underway.

The best bit about Britmums for me was connecting with some of my favourite bloggers including meeting the lovely Vicki from Honest Mum for the second time this year. Vicki just has it, she has confidence, she’s engaging and she actually wants to communicate with everyone. I was also lucky enough to meet the amazing Susi from So Happy In Town (SHIT) and we instantly hit it off, this lady has done so much with her blog in such a short space of time is certainly one to watch out for. Kirsty from the amazing blog Winnettes was so sweet and as bubbly in person as you would expect from her lovely blog.

Just some of the lovely ladies I met on the day.

Britmums was worth the visit and something I plan to go back to next year for the whole day and evening, to get as much as possible out of it. It’s helped me re-focus on my blog and find my voice again and connect with some lovely inspiring ladies. I even managed the underground and train home on my own, which for me with little to no sense of direction is a huge achievement in itself.

Here is to the future of The Muddled Mother.


What was the best advice you received to battle through postnatal depression?

What was the best advice you received to battle through postnatal depression?

Postnatal depression sucks, it is isolating, exhausting and makes you forget who you are whilst it deprives you from making special memories with your beautiful new baby. For me the battle through postnatal depression was a long hard slog and without support and help I honestly don’t know what I would have done, but the good news is I survived, just like everyone can with the right advice and support. My blog heavily focuses on my battle through postnatal depression and I do my best to provide advice and support in an honest and loving way.

Unfortunately a stigma still surrounds mental illness in general and unless we don’t keep talking about it nothing will change. There are many parenting blogs around and it’s something I love being a part of, but even I was surprised when I first started blogging a few months ago at how many mummy bloggers have also struggled through postnatal depression when in the real world I didn’t seem to know that many mums who were going through this battle. Something changed once I hit publish on my first post and that something was conversation, I started getting messages from Facebook friends and even strangers who could resonate with how I felt and that also have some kind of experience of postnatal depression. My going public I quickly realised that I wasn’t alone and talking with other women helped me understand my own battle so much better.

I decided to ask some other mummy bloggers what was the best piece of advice that received whist battling postnatal depression and here is what they came up with.


  • Sophie from Soph Obsessed shared “I was told by a really good friend that what I was feeling was normal! This just really resonated with me and reassured me because the whole time all I was thinking was ‘You are not normal!’


  • Laura from Five Little Doves shared  “The best advice I had was to see my GP. Having suffered in silence for so long, taking that first step to getting the help I needed was a major turning point.”


  • Sophia from Tattooed Tea Lady shared “Never be afraid to speak out. Talking to your GP is a huge and brave step to make – but you can also talk to friends, family, anyone who you feel comfortable. PND can be an extremely scary thing to go through, particularly with the media perception only ever sharing the worst instances – you are not alone, people want to help and you will come through the other side. “


  • Sarah from  A Few Favourite Things shared “To take each hour as it comes. Instead of thinking about the day ahead and how I would manage, I was told to break it up into chunks.”


  • Emma from Me and B Make Tea shared “Go talk to someone – be it your doctor, a therapist, a friend or someone online. Just talk.”


  • Lynne from A Day in The Life of a Mum of 6 shared “Mine would have to be building up the courage to get help. Try and not bottle your feelings up and take all the help you can either medical or help at home.”


  • Veronica from My Parenting Journey shared “I was feeling off when I had my first baby, first thing I did was write a journal, poured everything I was feeling (joy, fear, sadness, everything). Then one day I started talking to myself, it’s funny thinking about it now, but it helped me. I encouraged myself and assured myself that everything’s going to be okay. After than you should start talking to someone, talking would really help.”


  • Emma from Our Fairy Tale Adventure shared “It’s really okay to admit you are struggling. I was so scared that if I admitted I was finding it difficult, that someone would come and take my baby away from me. But that didn’t happen, I got help, someone to just talk to… I got support. So please reach out if you are finding it difficult. Reach out to somebody! Parenting is hard. Parenting when you feel alone is even harder and it really doesn’t have to be like that.”


  • Emma from The Cheshire Wife shared “Don’t be afraid to ask for help! It took me 18 months of feeling rubbish to ask my Heath visitor for help.”


Personally for me my best advice is be honest and patient with yourself. Postnatal depression is a tough battle and something that will take time to overcome. The other thing is a big one for me, which is to let go of guilt, as it will hold you back from getting better.

Many thanks to all the bloggers that were happy enough to contribute to my post.